Magyars

Lead the mighty Black Army over the Hungarian plains and command the fiercest cavalry forces that Europe has ever witnessed in the Middle Ages. The old continent has never been at peace during the Middle Ages, and the Magyars, being the gateway from the Western to the Eastern world surely had their share of epic battles.

► Magyars.mp3

Quick Card

Cavalry civilization

  • Villagers kill wolves with 1 strike
  • Forging, Iron Casting, Blast Furnace free (requires blacksmith)
  • Scout Cavalry, Light Cavalry, Hussar cost -10%

Unique Units:

  • Magyar Huszar (cavalry)

Unique Technologies:

  • Recurve Bow: Cavalry Archers +1 range
  • Mercenaries: Magyar Huszars cost no gold

Team Bonus:

  • Foot archers +2 LOS

History

The origins of the Magyars can be traced back to at least 2.000 B.C. when they lived as nomadic hunters in the area between the Volga River and the Ural Mountains. Before 500 A.D. they started to migrate towards Central Europe. In the 8th century they moved to the region near the river Don, but moved on to today’s Ukraine after a civil war had broken out in the 9th century. Another war, the Bulgaro-Byzantine war, forced the Magyars to migrate one more time around 896: under their leader Arpad they conquered the few Slavs living in the Carpathian Basin. Here they finally settled themselves and founded the principality of Hungary.

The principality of Hungary was in the beginning little more than a federation of tribes ruled by a descendant of Arpad, called the Grand Prince. In order to keep the tribes unified, the Magyars conducted raids all over Europe during the 9th and 10th century. Their army consisted mostly out of light cavalry equipped with an Asian reflex bow which was an heritage from their eastern origin. The Magyars favored quick charges preceded by a volley of arrows. After the Magyar defeat in the battle of Lechfeld (955) they started to abandon the tactic of raiding and adopted a Western European style of warfare: heavy and light cavalry mixed with infantry.

The end of raids also resulted in a political challenge: the links between tribes were weakening. Here as well, Grand Princes sought a solution in Western European models. Prince Stephen I accomplished his father plan by consolidating power, reforming the state and establishing Christianity in Hungary. His coronation by the pope in 1000 marked the foundation of the kingdom of Hungary. During the steady 11th – 12th century Hungary became more like a Western European society. However, in the 13th century the kingdom suffered: the king lost power to his nobles while a Mongol invasion devastated the country in 1241. In addition, the last king of the Arpads dies in 1301 which resulted in 7 years of internal warfare.

After these 7 years Charles Robert of house Anjou was elected as the first foreign king. It was also the beginning of the golden era for the kingdom: royal power was restored and a policy of conquest made Hungary one of the largest realms in Europe. One of the key factors in this renewal of power were the goldmines of Hungary and the growing importance of monetary trade, on which both the king had a monopoly. Together with the blooming agriculture, focused on cattle and wine, it helped to restore the kingdom from the previous century.

During the same golden era the Ottoman-Turkish Empire was expanding rapidly. Since the coronation of Stephen I the kingdom of Hungary was the most eastern of Christian realms. With this act the medieval culture of the Magyars had gained shape: the heritage from the Eurasian steppes was pushed into obscurity, while Christian and Western European elements were adopted. Hungary marked the boundary for Romanesque and Gothic architecture, sculpture and painting. The city Buda even became a Renaissance center in the 15th century.

The kingdom was thus a great Christian bastion against the Mongols and later the Russians in the east, and against the Byzantine Empire and later the Ottoman-Turkish Empire in the south. In 1456 general Hunyadi won a decisive battle which stopped the expansion of the Ottomans to Europe for decades. However in the 16th century the Hungarian bastion finally fell: the northwest came under Habsburg rule, while the south fell into the hands of the Ottoman Empire.

  • Leep

    Great civilization! Trust me, I’m Hungarian, I would know. Also, that violin from the Magyar theme is AMAZING. Simply outstanding. I occasionally find short bits of music that just click with me and this is definitely one of them.
    PS:
    AoE 2 is one of those games that asks you to leave some of the detail to your imagination, and the villagers kill wolves in one hit bonus is a great example. It instantly changes my perspective of the villagers that I send out to work, even the women. These are self-reliant, hardy people living on the fringe of “civilized” western Europe.
    PSS: Bravo on all of the music and voice acting. They REALLY do sound like the ES crew dusted off the old audio equipment and had another go. I can’t even describe how pleasing it is to hear the music and voice acting in this expansion, because it fits RIGHT IN WITH THE ORIGINAL AUDIO.

    • thestrider99

      wow i didn’t now Hungari was so awesome until i played this game
      so how do you say in hungarian: sorry hungarian’s i didn’t now you kick ass

      • vorosbika

        “Bocsánat magyarok, nem tudtam hogy seggbe rúgtok” :D
        ‘Bocsánat’-Sorry
        ‘magyarok’-hungarians
        ‘nem’-no (here: didn’t, because we sign the past tense elsewhere)
        ‘tudtam’ – I knew (-t shows pat, -m shows ‘I’)
        ‘hogy’ -that
        ‘seggbe’- ass
        ‘rúgtok’- you kick
        :P

        Whith English pronunciation it would be written like this:
        Botssaanat Maggyarok, naem tudttam hogyy sseggbe roogtok.
        :D

        • Stephaenus

          I think what our friend wanted to mention with “you kick ass” is that “you’re cool” so the correct translation would be: “Bocsánat magyarok, nem tudtam, hogy (ekkora) királyok vagytok!” (^_^)

          By the way: [thestrider99] we appreciate your comment, thank you!

  • Speedy

    Hello all

    Very nice new civilization, i’m glad that somehow i found a bit of my own country inside this wonderfull game.
    Iancu de Hunedoara ( Gen. Hunyadi), was a very important personality in Romanian history. His son Matei Corvin, was a very important king of Hungary.
    The wonder you’ve chosen for this civilization, Castel Hunyad, is located in Romania, in Hunedoara county, the former domain of Iancu.
    As to the description, there are some inconsistencies, Hungary’s neighbours were Transilvania and Moldova (E) and Valahia ( Tara Romaneasca S) for many centuries. No mongols or byzantines, or slavs.
    As to the fact that Arpad has found some slavs in the Carpathian basin,he couldn’t. The slavs were still in Asia.
    Anyway a nice civilization, thanks to all the people involved to make this. It brought back the game of my childhood.

    • Sosimusz

      Let me get this straight: you’re wrong. It’s no wonder, because Romania doesn’t have credible history education, it’s much more like nationalist nonsense.
      1. Iancu de Hunedoara? Matei Corvin? Please. These forms are only translations and it’s unlikely they were ever used by them. They never considered themselves Romanian, because in that age they were nobles in the Kingdom of Hungary and our modern idea of being part of a nation or ethnicity was formed in the 19th century.
      2. The historical neighbours in the upper text were rightly named because the principalities of Wallachia and Moldavia were founded in the 14th century (the latter was a puppet state created by Hungary to repel attacks from the east), and they were annexed by the Ottomans. And Transylvania was part of Hungary between 896 and 1920, except for the time of Ottoman conquest of Hungary between 1541 and 1711, when it was a sovereign state ruled by Hungarian nobility.
      3. There are numerous historically credible theories on the origin of Slavs, but all put their place of origin in Europe.

  • Mancuso

    I must say you have done a fine job with this civilization, heartfelt Congratulations! You have demonstrated so much attention and care for details that the end result is just flattering.

    Modern game designers, when picking civilizations for their medieval strategy games only go as far back as the 20th or 19th century, tops. This is only logical from a sales perspective – but that is one solid reason why they do not pick other, more “forgotten” ones. Nevertheless, if you have a look at a map of Europe in the 14th century, it really is plain to see that Hungary does have an important role to play – one that has always been overlooked and neglected by game designers for simple sales reasons – have a look at a map of Europe today and you will see what I mean.

    The content included with the civilization is fabulous and of extremely good quality. Even localized villager and soldier sounds, often cited as irritating and surreal in other games are clear and non-disturbing. Gameplaywise, the civilization bonuses are well laid out and one can even relate to the more obscure “fast wolf killing” trait, which does have some historical ties in the nation’s literature. The civilization is well balanced, with obvious historical strengths (cavalry) and weaknesses (weak to organized defenses, archery+halberds). Even the Magyar Huszar, a unit deemed controversial is balanced in my eyes, sacrificing LOS and monk bonus for combat capabilities. Its cheap costs are balanced out by the lack of specific bonuses, which any other, more expensive unique unit has. My only gripe here is that the unit visually looks more like a Roman Empire cavalry, but I guess we can live with that. All the other content compensates us beyond expectations.

    Once again, congratulations for a job that is far more loyal to this civ than anything else even on the commercial market. The excellent start sound, the UI graphic and the civilization design all leave nothing to be desired. This is a fun and accurate civilization that does not throw off game balance in any way and thus earns my 5 stars rating.

  • thestrider99

    congrat’s hungaria you got a place in my top 5 AoE civis in 3 minutes

  • DarkFoxFire

    Magyars – the best civilization for me. They are good in battle and huszars have bonus vs siege… so good civ with cheap army!

  • Magyar-magyar

    Japanese and Byzantines and the Spaniards used to be my favorite civ, Magyars are now my favs, The Magyar huzsar goes together with paladins just a s good as the Korean onagers go with War wagons. A great civ!

  • Magyar-magyar

    Couldn’t they have given them a more exotic wonder though?

  • yamane

    about the unique tech for the maggyars about the no gold cost, i think the hussars should be worth more food like 95 f 10 g, in order to place them somewhere in between knights and light cavalry,,, ( y would u buy light cavalry costing 72 f when u can have hussars for 80 f, the mag husars is almost a replacement for the light cav, i thinks its better to have an inbewteen unit) and instead of attack bonus vs siege ( which seems more usefull on defense) how bout attack bonus vs villagers!,,, anyway about the unique tech instead of eliminating the gold cost for the maggyars how about we increase cav speed by 15%?? i think more useful in raiding and giving the Magyars strong raiding abilities